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FINSENY: Future Internet Technologies for the Smart Energy (II)

FINSENY Mission & Strategy:

The FINSENY Mission and Strategy, which define what the project plans are, and how they will be accomplished:

« Demonstrate, by 2015, how open Future Internet Technologies can enable the European energy system to combine adaptive intelligence with reliability and cost-efficiency to meet, sustainably, the demands of an increasingly complex and dynamic energy landscape. »

 FINSENY is specifying use cases, ICT requirements and architectures in the Smart Energy domain for five scenarios which have been identified as strongly benefiting from Future Internet technologies:

a)      Distribution Networks,
b)     
Microgrids,
c)     
Smart Buildings,
d)     
Electric Mobility and
e)     
Electronic Marketplace for Energy.

Distribution System (DS):

Problem Statements

  • The increasing amount of volatile DER generation in the Distribution System will change today’s well planned, standard load profile based operation to a dynamic demand response based approach based on actual status information from the medium down to the low voltage parts of the grid.
  • Energy flows are increasingly bidirectional, intensifying person safety and grid overload issues and demanding an increase of efficiency of energy distribution.
  • New smart energy applications are to be incorporated which handle the need for varying generation and demand levels to be balanced while optimally utilising grid resources.
  • Ubiquitous ICT solutions need to be defined, designed, financed, built, operated & maintained (see design principles in the above section).

Mission

  • “Design a future ICT solution for Distribution System automation & control to increase energy quality, reliability, robustness and safety and to ease integration of Distributed Energy Resources.”

Focus

  • Automated fault restoration, power analysis & control, grid maintenance.

Customers and Benefits

  • DSOs will get the solutions to optimally handle grid capacity and energy flows.
  • Service providers will get the interfaces to provide innovative energy services.
  • Prosumers can optimise their generation and consumption based on a stable distribution grid.

Key factors to judge the quality of the outputs

  • Reliability, safety, security and cost-efficiency of the solutions.

Key Features and Technologies

  • Decentralised operation, connectivity and control by scalable ICT solutions.

Outputs Critical Factors

  • Interoperability and integration (with legacy systems), scalability, allowing both centralised and de-centralised control, open & secure ICT solutions.

Microgrid:

Problem Statements

  • How to operate local low voltage or even mid-voltage distribution systems with Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and storage devices to satisfy demand of energy consumers in an autonomous (islanding mode) or semi-autonomous (interconnected to the main grid) way.
  • How to build the Microgrid platform on Future Internet technologies to be more cost-efficient, flexible, secure, scalable, reliable, robust and modular.

Mission

  • “Design a reliable and cost-efficient Microgrid platform which ensures flexibility, scalability and robustness. The design will be modular and applications/services will be loosely coupled. Devices in or at the edge of the grid (e.g. DERs) will be easily integrated and control/communication networks will be managed to ensure the right level of QoS.”

Focus

  • Microgrid Control Centre and interface to the control and communication network to operate the system and integrate prosumers with e.g. DERs or Smart Buildings.
  • Configuration, monitoring & control, data management & processing.

Customers and Benefits

  • Microgrid operator has a flexible Microgrid platform to deploy in his environment.
  • Prosumers have an aggregation platform to include their DERs and flexible demand.

Key factors to judge the quality of the outputs

  • Internet of Things technologies for device & resource management, connectivity services at the interface to networks, data management and security.

Key Features and Technologies

  • Decentralised operation, connectivity and control by scalable ICT solutions.

Outputs Critical Factors

  • Regulatory hurdles, but already aligned with the governmental goals for an increased share of renewable energy and higher reliability by providing cost-efficiency.

Smart Buildings:

Problem Statements

Comprehensive building energy management:

  • With the combined goals of building-scale optimisation (local source-load-storage balancing and efficiency and grid-scale optimisation (demand-response)).
  • Under constraints of scalability, separation of concerns and auto-configuration.

Mission

  • “Design of future comprehensive Building Energy Management Systems as flexible edge of the Smart Energy system and as key element for shared Future Internet platforms.”

Focus

  • Make it possible to monitor and control all energy-relevant building subsystems, appliances and other physical entities operating on top of a shared platform, a building “operating system” provided to all building applications.
  • Managing all entities through common interfaces based on a generic model akin to that of a peripheral driver in a computer operating system.

Customers and Benefits

  • Building owners and stakeholders
  • Facilities managers and building services providers
  • Building end-users
  • All shall benefit from a horizontal building energy management system that interoperates fully with other building automation systems operating on top of the same shared building operating system.

Key factors to judge the quality of the outputs

  • Use smart building “operating system” providing interface to the buildings physical entities and common service layer to be shared by all building applications.

Key Features and Technologies

  • Provide information models and interfaces that encompass all energy-relevant legacy building hardware and equipment. Demonstrate corresponding monitoring and control interfaces for key types of such equipment.
  • Provide information models and interfaces that make it possible to interoperate with existing building ICT systems. Demonstrate corresponding monitoring and control interfaces for such systems.
  • Specify application layer that combines local and global energy optimisation.

Electric Vehicles:

Problem Statements

  • As the number of electric vehicles on our roads increases, the charging of electric vehicles will become a major load on the electricity grid and it’s management poses challenges to the energy system as well as offering a contribution to solutions to balancing the volatility of energy generation from renewable sources.
  • The provision of a seamless infrastructure for charging electric vehicles in Europe poses challenges to the transport, the energy and the payment infrastructure owners as well as well as to regulators. At the same time, electric vehicles, if connected wirelessly to the transport infrastructures, offer the potential to support multi-modal transport solutions.

Mission

  • “Design Smart Energy solutions so that electric vehicles will be an integrated part of the energy infrastructure, maximising their benefits to the energy infrastructure.”

Focus

  • Defining the role that electric vehicles can play in the Smart Energy infrastructure.

Customers and Benefits

  • Energy stakeholders are provided with scenarios for integrating electric vehicles into their plans for evolution towards Smart Energy solutions.
  • Energy stakeholders are given an overview of the ICT requirements and functional architecture issues from the perspective of electrical vehicle usage.
  • Users can charge in a user friendly way and can use electric vehicles as part of multi-modal transport solutions.
  • Energy stakeholders could possibly use the control of charging times for the vehicles to assist in energy grid management.

Key factors to judge the quality of the outputs

  • Defined ICT requirements and functional architecture enabling the integration of electric vehicles into the energy infrastructure.

Key Features and Technologies

  • Scalable solutions as number of vehicles grow, access to services wherever the user is via cloud computing and defined network interfaces. Wireless and fixed converged networks, infrastructure as a service.

Outputs Critical Factors

  • Open interfaces and secure ICT solutions are needed. The high speed of change in the market as the commercial side of electric vehicles develops is already evident creating timing issues for the introduction of common solutions. Regulatory issues will play a key role in this emerging market.

Electronic Market Place for Smart Energy:

Problem Statements

  • Those who are going to participate more actively in the energy supply, such as DSM customers, Prosumers, Microgrids, DERs, need a kind of electronic market place (for information and services). The services should be offered via the Future Internet. This electronic market place could in particular give information useful for balancing supply and demand and to check grid restrictions.

Mission

  • “Design ICT systems to extend web based energy information, demand shaping and energy trading services for the emerging energy market players.”

Focus

  • ICT systems to enhance contract negotiation, competitive price awareness and energy trading also at regional-level.

Customers and Benefits

  • Final Energy customers should be more aware and have a broader choice of Energy supply; energy trading at micro levels will be available for new prosumers, as well as better management of grid stability and planning for utilities.

Key factors to judge the quality of the outputs

  • Very flexible and secure web based energy services.

Key Features and Technologies

  • Large scale data gathering and management via web, Internet of Energy linked objects and customers-prosumers.

Outputs Critical Factors

  • Perceived marketplace trustworthiness from energy stakeholders will be fundamental together with the user engagement via the Internet in Smart Energy services promoted in FINSENY.

Conclusion:

FINSENY is a Future Internet (FI) project studying innovative new FI technologies to apply them to the Smart Energy landscape. The need for more ICT as described in this paper is widely agreed in the Smart Energy community to accomplish the challenges of the envisioned energy system. Future Internet technologies offer several opportunities for Smart Energy solutions, including connectivity, management, service enablement, distributed intelligence as well as security and privacy.

In the FINSENY project, key players from the ICT and energy sectors teamed-up to analyse the most relevant Smart Energy scenarios, identify prominent ICT requirements, develop reference architectures and prepare pan-European trials. As part of the FI-PPP, FINSENY will demonstrate over the three phases of the programme that Smart Energy needs can be fulfilled through an ecosystem of generic and Smart Energy specific ICT enablers running on top of an open Future Internet platform.

FINSENY will shape the European Future Internet ICT platform(s) to support the emerging European Smart Energy era. The growing Smart Grid Stakeholder Group will provide broad visibility of the on-going project work in the energy community, enhancing the acceptability of the project results and facilitating the development of the Smart Energy landscape.

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